CREIGHTON UNIVERSITY       

CROCHET AND KNIT GROUP

CURRENT NUMBER OF ITEMS DONATED TO CHARITY IS 1,795!

MEETINGS AND TEACHING SCHEDULES

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

HOW TO CROCHET INSTRUCTIONS

HOW TO KNIT INSTRUCTIONS

HOW TO START A GROUP IN YOUR COMMUNITY

WEB LINKS FOR FREE PATTERNS

SIMPLE BEGINNER KNIT AND CROCHET PATTERNS

PICTURES OF OUR CHARITY WORKand recognitions

STRESS RELIEF AND OTHER BENEFITS OF CROCHETING AND KNITTING

RECIPES

 

CROCHET/KNIT HOME PAGE

 

 

WHY CROCHET AND KNIT?

·        It has a calming effect – helps relieve stress!  It feels good to work with beautiful yarn colors and textures!           

·        Create sweaters, hats, scarves, mittens, afghans, etc. for others and yourself!

·        Gifts “you make yourself” for family and friends.

·        Children and adults in need of items include: domestic abuse victims, Hospice and local nursing home patients, foster children, low-income families, victims of natural disaster, fires, floods, tornadoes, etc.

·        It is a social activity to share with co-workers, friends, and family.

·        Knitting and Crocheting is “portable” – take it anywhere! 

·        Provides a sense of accomplishment when you complete a project.

·        Adds balance to a high-tech, fast-paced, stressful lifestyle.

·        Cost-effective hobby–you can help others with NO cost to you but your time.

·        Maximizes your time while you watch TV, travel, sports events, etc.

·        Carry on a family tradition.

·        Express yourself—design an original garment and accessories.

·        If you have arthritis, knitting or crocheting help to keep the fingers limber. 

·        Knitting and crocheting helps stave off Alzheimer’s (and I could use all the help I can get there!).

 

Please see the article below.  Because of all of you and your "generous spirit" we can and do accomplish great things together as the Crochet Knit Group!  But this generous spirit also benefits YOU as well (see below).  Another reason to learn to knit or crochet and be a member of our group. 

If you know of anyone who would like to learn to knit or crochet, already knows how - just needs some encouragement to get started again (we would love to have more people who enjoying sewing hats/scarves as well), or they need an outlet for their creative juices, please bring them to the next meeting to join us. 

Joleen

A Generous Spirit

By Dr. John H. Sklare
Wednesday, November 30, 2005
Research now suggests that helping others on a regular basis can help YOU live a longer and healthier life. Studies now show that a helping spirit brings with it both physical and emotional benefits. This research, regarding the health benefits of “helping,” provides even more compelling health reasons to get yourself involved and reach out to those in need. According to researchers at UCLA, giving day-to-day help is good for you and can protect the helper’s health. “Helper's High” is the term coined by Arizona State University psychologist Robert Cialdini to describe the euphoria reported by frequent givers in his research. These good feelings can lower the output of stress hormones, which improves cardiovascular health and strengthens the immune system. I encourage you to take heed of this new research and find a way to work a moderate dose of helping into your daily life. As it turns out, helping is truly health food for the soul! Wishing You Great Health!

 Article taken from the website below:

http://www.lifescript.com/channels/well_being/Inspiration/a_generous_spirit.asp

 

Volunteering Is Good For Your Health

  • There is good reason to volunteer... studies say that volunteering is good for your mental and physical health. Meaningful and rewarding volunteer work can add balance and perspective to your life. Meeting people, learning new skills, receiving positive feedback about a job well done does wonders for you and the people you are helping.
     

  • Did you know that stress related health problems improve after performing kind acts? A rush of euphoria, followed by a longer period of calm, after performing a kind act is often referred to as a "helper's high" involving physical sensations and the release of your bodies natural painkillers, the endorphins. This initial rush is then followed by a longer lasting period of improved emotional well-being. The health benefits and sense of well-being return for hours or even days when the helping act is remembered.
     

  • Adopting an altruistic lifestyle is a critical component of good mental health. And the practice of caring for strangers translates to immense immune and healing benefits.

http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/004342.html

The joy of stitch
Posted by Teresa at 10:03 AM * 75 comments

Jim Capozzola of The Rittenhouse Review tipped me off to this article in the NYTimes about a program that has half the pupils at a New Jersey elementary school learning to knit:

They sat in a circle, all eyes on their knitting, colorful yarns slowly lengthening as their needles moved rhythmically, back and forth, back and forth. They kept up a steady conversation, about what they were making, about how else they spend their lives, but the wooden No. 9 needles never stopped their quick movements.

“Knitting is like sleeping,” said one of the knitters.

“It’s so quiet,” said another. “I’m usually very jittery, but when I knit, I calm down.”

“You make a lot of friends when you knit, people you wouldn’t think you’d meet,” a third said.

They may have sounded like little old ladies at a sewing circle, but in fact they were schoolchildren at Seth Boyden Elementary School in Maplewood, N.J. Instead of going outside for recess, they were sitting on the floor in a hallway a week ago, knitting scarves, doll clothes, bags.

Judith Symonds, an instructional aide at the school, started the knitting program last year as a winter activity, something to do at recess when the playground was too wet or frozen. Ms. Symonds taught 85 children and 20 adults how to knit. As others heard about the program, they wanted in, too. It grew so popular that the sessions continued even as the spring thaw came, right up until the very last day of school. They resumed as soon as school started in September.

Now, more than 250 of the school’s 535 pupils take part in the program, which still takes place in the hallway during recess. The principal, Kristopher Harrison, has learned to knit along with the children. And sometimes, the school’s head custodian, Malik Muhammad, also sits and knits.

The program, called Knitting Together a Community, proved so alluring that Ms. Symonds started an evening session so parents and children could knit together. She has also talked to teachers and parents from other schools who want to start their own knitting programs. …

A spokeswoman for the South Orange-Maplewood School District, Michelle Loxton, said that Knitting Together a Community teaches children success through persistence, concentration, control, follow-through and mastery. Knitting itself, she said, improves fine-motor skills, hand-eye coordination and brain development.

The children say they just like it.

Later on in the story you get a ten-year-old boy, sitting there in the hallway knitting with his buddies, saying “With knitting, you don’t have a care in the world.”

From the sound of it, he and his friends have discovered one of the great truths of knitting: it feels good. Knitting is good. It produces a sort of serene buzz, and every so often you look down and find you’ve finished a cap or sweater. Knitting while chatting with other knitters is even better. (Knitting envy is not good. It’s what happens when you’re at a gathering where others have brought their knitting, but you haven’t brought yours. There’s a distinct sense of deprivation.)

Besides, knitting helps stave off Alzheimer’s. This is great news. It means all those bags in my basement aren’t too much yarn. They’re an investment in my long-term mental health.

Gardening, which is also on the list of activities that stave off Alzheimer’s, feels good in much the same way that knitting does, only you can’t carry it with you in your bag, and it doesn’t use up nearly as much wool.

 

For and article on the Healing Power of Crafts see the site below.

http://www.clnonline.com/archives/katesarchives/2005/kates20050404.html